Black History Films

28 Days, 28 Films for Black History

Farmer’s markets

Farmer’s Markets Open 

Image result for farmers market hartford ct

Farmer’s Markets are open for business.  They accept cash, WIC, SNAP and EBT. For more information: http://www.hartfordfarmersmarkets.org/.  For a market in your neighborhood, click here.

Hartford ‐ 505 Hudson
Wednesdays, 10 a.m. ‐ 1 p.m.
July 11 ‐ Oct. 31
Parking Lot, 505 Hudson St.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

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Hartford ‐ Billings Forge
Thursdays, 11 a.m. ‐ 2 p.m.
June 7 ‐ Oct. 25
On the Green Next to Firebox Restaurant, 539 Broad St
billingsforgecommunityworks.org/farmers‐market
Social Media: FB
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Frog Hollow
Mondays & Fridays, 3 p.m. ‐ 6 p.m.
June 8 ‐ Nov. 2
At the Farm at Knox, Inc., 75 Laurel St.
knoxhartford.org/farmersmarket 
FB, IG, T
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Hartford Health Dept.
Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m. ‐ 12:30 p.m.
July 10 ‐ Oct. 30
Health Dept. Courtyard, 410 Capital Ave.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

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Hartford ‐ North End
Wednesdays, 10 a.m. ‐ 1 p.m.
June 27 ‐ Oct. 31
Front Lawn of Hartford North End Senior
Center, 80 Coventry St.
www.hartfordfood.org/programs/north‐end‐farmers‐market
Social Media: FB, T
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Park Street
Mondays, 9:30 a.m. ‐ 1 p.m.
July 2 ‐ Oct. 29
Corner of Park & Washington St.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

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Hartford ‐ Promise Zone Community
Saturdays, 8 a.m. ‐ 11 a.m.
June 16 ‐ Oct. 20
Corner of Woodland & Albany Ave.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ West End
Tuesdays, 4 p.m. ‐ 7 p.m.‐ June‐Sept. in Oct. 3
p.m.‐ 6 p.m.
June 5 ‐ Oct. 30
Clemens Place Park, 16 Owen St.
wefm.org 
Social Media: FB, IG
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Old State House
Tuesdays & Fridays, 10 a.m. ‐ 2 p.m.
June 12 ‐ Oct. 30
West Brick Plaza, Main St.
Social Media: FB, IG, T
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

Diabetic Neuropathy

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Do You Have  Peripheral Neuropathy?

  • Who Gets It?  People who are obese, have prediabetes or metabolic syndrome, or diabetes. Sometimes it is caused by chemotherapy.
  • What Does It Feel Like?   Your feet or fingers feel like “pins and needles.” The lightest touch on your feet might be painful.  If you get pedicures, you may stop because it is too painful.  You may become unsteady or find walking painful.
  • How Is It Treated?  Sometimes pain-relieving cream is used. Physical therapy might be recommended. However, there is no cure.
  • So What’s a Person to Do? Put your feet up when you sit down. Move them around to keep the blood flowing. Look at your feet carefully every day. Check for injuries or cracked skin. Wear shoes.

Lower Your Risk of a Stroke

Lower Your Risk of a Stroke? Do These Things:

  • exercise
  • keep an eye on your blood pressure
  • lose weight if you are overweight
  • limit your alcoholic drinks to 1 a day
  • don’t let your diabetes get out of control
  • put fiber in your diet; eat 7-9 servings of fruits and vegetables each day
  • take your medication as instructed
  • stop smoking – and that includes e-cigs
  • don’t get dehydrated; get plenty of water through drinking and eating water-rich vegetables and fruits

Learn How To Use LimeBike, Hartford’s First Bike Share Program

Image result for lime bikeThe city’s first bike-share program is up and running – riding – with residents at crosswalks and bus stops gawking as LimeBike employees installed the bright green bikes at locations across Hartford.

LimeBike, the brainchild of CEO Toby Sun and a prominent Silicon Valley firm, provides affordable, dockless pedal bikes to cities and college campuses across the United States. Hartford will be the startup’s first location in Connecticut, and the program comes at no cost to the city.

Where are the bikes?
Hartford’s new fleet of 300 bikes initially will be placed at hot spots designated by the company. Rows of five to six bikes have been set up at locations such as Statehouse Square and the Bushnell Plaza sculpture garden. The bikes are locked and ready for use with just the scan of a QR code. The technology is powered by a solar panel on each bike.

Click Here for The Complete Hartford Courant Article

What Your Eyes Say About Your Health

blurry vision

Sudden Blurry Vision

An abrupt and dramatic loss of vision may be a sign of a problem with the blood flow to your eye or your brain. Immediate medical attention can prevent serious damage and may even save your life. Even if your vision gets better quickly, it might still be a warning of a stroke or the beginning of a migraine headache

vision with diabetic retinopathy

Blurred Vision

This can be a sign of diabetes, which causes too much sugar in your blood. If it isn’t well managed, you may get diabetic retinopathy (when tiny blood vessels in your eyes leak blood and other fluids). You may have blurred vision and find it hard to see at night. Doctors can use a laser to seal the leaks and get rid of unwanted new blood vessels. This may affect your side vision, but it can save your central vision.Look at the entire slideshow here.

Maya Angelou

 

Image result for maya angelou

Marguerite Annie Johnson Angelou (April 4, 1928, to May 28, 2014), known as Maya Angelou, was an American author, actress, screenwriter, dancer, poet and civil rights activist best known for her 1969 memoir, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, which made literary history as the first nonfiction best-seller by an African-American woman. Angelou received several honors throughout her career, including two NAACP Image Awards in the outstanding literary work (nonfiction) category, in 2005 and 2009.  Read more about her life and accomplishments here.

UCC Members/Clergy Join Protest of ICE Policy

7/3/2018    By Andrew Page

HARTFORD – Hundreds of protesters gathered in front of the Abraham A. Ribicoff Federal Building and Courthouse on Monday demanding the Trump administration reunite children who’ve been separated from their migrant parents in recent months. Others called for and end to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency. Thirty five protesters were arrested, including two UCC pastors.

Rev. Stephen Camp, pastor of Faith Congregational Church, was the first to be arrested, charged with breach of peace and trespassing after he stood blocking the entrance to the building.

“The church really does have a voice in the intersection between the church and the state and this is one place where that voice is important,” said Camp after he was released with a summons on Monday.

Camp had been asked to participate and spoke with his congregation about the need to be that voice during Sunday’s sermon. He said the congregation was “100% with me and whatever I needed to do today.” Faith Congregation Church members have even explored what it would mean to be a sanctuary church. Read more here.

Changing Names, Changing History

This school showed the power of a simple name change when confronting a racist legacy.

   Eric Pfeiffer

The last public building in Virginia’s capital with a Confederate name is getting a makeover. Thanks, Obama.

On June 18, the Richmond School District voted 6-1 to change the name of J.E.B Stuart Elementary to Barack Obama Elementary.

Why does that matter?

Stuart was a U.S. Army officer who switched sides to join the Confederacy during the Civil War and became one of the South’s top military strategists. Richmond school officials wanted to let go of inappropriately honoring a pro-slavery leader, and do so in a way that built bridges in the community.

“It’s incredibly powerful that in the capital of the Confederacy, where we had a school named for an individual who fought to maintain slavery, that now we’re renaming that school after the first black president,” Richmond Public School Superintendent Jason Kamras said. “A lot of our kids, and our kids at J.E.B. Stuart, see themselves in Barack Obama.”

The elementary school body is 95% African-American and a number of school leaders suggested swapping out Stuart’s name for Obama’s, echoing a similar move at a Mississippi elementary school in 2017.Read more here.