Farmer’s markets

Farmer’s Markets Open 

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Farmer’s Markets are open for business.  They accept cash, WIC, SNAP and EBT. For more information: http://www.hartfordfarmersmarkets.org/.  For a market in your neighborhood, click here.

Hartford ‐ 505 Hudson
Wednesdays, 10 a.m. ‐ 1 p.m.
July 11 ‐ Oct. 31
Parking Lot, 505 Hudson St.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

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Hartford ‐ Billings Forge
Thursdays, 11 a.m. ‐ 2 p.m.
June 7 ‐ Oct. 25
On the Green Next to Firebox Restaurant, 539 Broad St
billingsforgecommunityworks.org/farmers‐market
Social Media: FB
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Frog Hollow
Mondays & Fridays, 3 p.m. ‐ 6 p.m.
June 8 ‐ Nov. 2
At the Farm at Knox, Inc., 75 Laurel St.
knoxhartford.org/farmersmarket 
FB, IG, T
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Hartford Health Dept.
Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m. ‐ 12:30 p.m.
July 10 ‐ Oct. 30
Health Dept. Courtyard, 410 Capital Ave.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

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Hartford ‐ North End
Wednesdays, 10 a.m. ‐ 1 p.m.
June 27 ‐ Oct. 31
Front Lawn of Hartford North End Senior
Center, 80 Coventry St.
www.hartfordfood.org/programs/north‐end‐farmers‐market
Social Media: FB, T
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Park Street
Mondays, 9:30 a.m. ‐ 1 p.m.
July 2 ‐ Oct. 29
Corner of Park & Washington St.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

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Hartford ‐ Promise Zone Community
Saturdays, 8 a.m. ‐ 11 a.m.
June 16 ‐ Oct. 20
Corner of Woodland & Albany Ave.
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ West End
Tuesdays, 4 p.m. ‐ 7 p.m.‐ June‐Sept. in Oct. 3
p.m.‐ 6 p.m.
June 5 ‐ Oct. 30
Clemens Place Park, 16 Owen St.
wefm.org 
Social Media: FB, IG
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized, SNAP

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Hartford ‐ Old State House
Tuesdays & Fridays, 10 a.m. ‐ 2 p.m.
June 12 ‐ Oct. 30
West Brick Plaza, Main St.
Social Media: FB, IG, T
Certified CT Grown, FMNP Authorized

Diabetic Neuropathy

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Do You Have  Peripheral Neuropathy?

  • Who Gets It?  People who are obese, have prediabetes or metabolic syndrome, or diabetes. Sometimes it is caused by chemotherapy.
  • What Does It Feel Like?   Your feet or fingers feel like “pins and needles.” The lightest touch on your feet might be painful.  If you get pedicures, you may stop because it is too painful.  You may become unsteady or find walking painful.
  • How Is It Treated?  Sometimes pain-relieving cream is used. Physical therapy might be recommended. However, there is no cure.
  • So What’s a Person to Do? Put your feet up when you sit down. Move them around to keep the blood flowing. Look at your feet carefully every day. Check for injuries or cracked skin. Wear shoes.

Lower Your Risk of a Stroke

Lower Your Risk of a Stroke? Do These Things:

  • exercise
  • keep an eye on your blood pressure
  • lose weight if you are overweight
  • limit your alcoholic drinks to 1 a day
  • don’t let your diabetes get out of control
  • put fiber in your diet; eat 7-9 servings of fruits and vegetables each day
  • take your medication as instructed
  • stop smoking – and that includes e-cigs
  • don’t get dehydrated; get plenty of water through drinking and eating water-rich vegetables and fruits

Health: Diabetes

More to Think About: Diabetes

Image result for type 2 diabetes
 You think you know About Type 2 Diabetes? Take a quick quiz here.

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WHAT YOU CAN DRINK, BESIDES WATER, WHEN YOU HAVE DIABETES

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn’t have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it’s as close as a tap. If you’re after something tastier, though, you’ve got options.  Click HERE for more information. My favorite – low fat chocolate milk!

Health News

Ok. You Gained Weight. These 5 Tips Will Get You Back on Track

Kirby Bumpus, MPH

BY KIRBY BUMPUS, MPH

 

Whether you are starting your weight loss journey, finding yourself in the middle of the struggle or working on maintenance, here are tips to keep you on track:

1. START NOW AND START SMALL   2. LOSE THE GUILT   3. CONSIDER HELP FROM THE PROS

Read the entire article here.

 

7 Tips for Mastering the Mental Side of Getting Fit

Paul L. Underwood   BY PAUL L. UNDERWOOD      myfitnesspal.com
All of us struggle with the mental side of being active, whether we’re neophytes looking to get in shape or seasoned trainers struggling with our latest challenge. It helps to remember that being fit isn’t some magical, permanent state of being. It’s an act of constant becoming, and it requires a certain discipline to make it a habit.
1. GOALS ARE OVERRATED
2. DON’T EXERCISE — TRAIN
3. GET SOCIAL
Read the entire article HERE.

Don’t Forget Flint!

Lead crisis: Flint braces as Michigan shuts down free bottled water sites

“My water stinks. It still burns to take a shower. There’s no way they can say it’s safe.”

by Erik Ortiz /  / Updated 

Shawn Jones, 42, right, and Tony Price, 54, distribute bottled water at a point of distribution in Flint, Michigan on Aug. 11, 2017.Terray Sylvester /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP file

 

After Michigan’s governor announced the state will stop providing free bottled water to residents of Flint — afflicted four years ago by lead-tainted drinking water — churches and charities said Monday they’re bracing for a surge in people seeking help.

 “Normally we give out whatever a family wants,” said Bill Quarles, a deacon of the First Trinity Missionary Baptist Church. “But now we may have to limit that until more supplies come in.”

Black Infant Mortality

More to Think About: Black Infant Mortality

Read the entire article here.   By Linda Villarosa

Editor’s note: This is an excerpt from “The Hidden Toll,” the cover story in the NY Times Sunday magazine.
Black infants in America are now more than twice as likely to die as white infants — 11.3 per 1,000 black babies, compared with 4.9 per 1,000 white babies, according to the most recent government data — a racial disparity that is actually wider than in 1850, 15 years before the end of slavery, when most black women were considered chattel. In one year, that racial gap adds up to more than 4,000 lost black babies. Education and income offer little protection. In fact, a black woman with an advanced degree is more likely to lose her baby than a white woman with less than an eighth-grade education.
This tragedy of black infant mortality is intimately intertwined with another tragedy: a crisis of death and near death in black mothers themselves. The United States is one of only 13 countries in the world where the rate of maternal mortality — the death of a woman related to pregnancy or childbirth up to a year after the end of pregnancy — is now worse than it was 25 years ago. Each year, an estimated 700 to 900 maternal deaths occur in the United States.
In addition, the C.D.C. reports more than 50,000 potentially preventable near-deaths, like Landrum’s, per year — a number that rose nearly 200 percent from 1993 to 2014, the last year for which statistics are available. Black women are three to four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than their white counterparts, according to the C.D.C. — a disproportionate rate that is higher than that of Mexico, where nearly half the population lives in poverty — and as with infants, the high numbers for black women drive the national numbers.

The crisis of maternal death and near-death also persists for black women across class lines. This year, the tennis star Serena Williams shared in Vogue the story of the birth of her first child and in further detail in a Facebook post. The day after delivering her daughter, Alexis Olympia, via C-section in September, Williams experienced a pulmonary embolism, the sudden blockage of an artery in the lung by a blood clot.

Is Your Metabolism Slow?

Scale

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How quickly your body burns calories varies from person to person. (Mine doesn’t burn any at all, or it seems that way to me sometimes!)  Women burn calories more slowly than men, and we all slow down after 40. What can you do to boost your metabolism?

  • Drink water.
  • Build muscle.
  • Get your heart pumping with aerobic exercise.
  • Eat spicy foods.
  • Have more frequent, smaller meals.
  • Eat lean protein.
  • Avoid yo-yo dieting.

Opioids, Heroin, and Death

Opioids, Heroin, and Death

Drug overdose deaths and opioid-involved deaths continue to increase in the United States. The majority of drug overdose deaths (more than six out of ten) involve an opioid.1  Since 1999, the number of overdose deaths involving opioids (including prescription opioids and heroin) quadrupled.2 From 2000 to 2015 more than half a million people died from drug overdoses. 91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. IN 2016, approximately 54,000 people died from opioid overdoses. That’s more than all the Americans who died in the Vietnam War, more than people killed because of gun violence, car crashes or from HIV/AIDS at the height of the AIDS epidemic.  In Connecticut, residents are more likely to die from unintentional drug overdose than a motor vehicle accident/ A majority of these deaths are linked to overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. According to 2013 CDC report, the Connecticut age-adjusted rate for drug induced mortality is 16.4 per 100,000 population compared to the nation rate of 14.6.

  • Listen to a very interesting interview on NPR’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross here.
  • Read about increases in drug and opioid-involved overdose deaths in the USA between 2010 – 2015   here.
  • Read about what we’re doing in CT  here.

Nutrition for Seniors

 

 Nutrition for Seniors

Most people don’t like cooking  just for themselves, so they rely on fast food, frozen meals or canned soup for their daily meals.  Seniors are particularly at risk because they often live alone, have little energy or money, and have taste buds that just don’t work like they used to. What can be done?

Eat with others. If you live alone, get together with friends or acquaintances and share a meal.
Shop sales. Look for fruits and vegetables in season when they are lower priced and have the best flavor.
Season food with herbs and spices, not salt.
Avoid sugary drinks. Not only are these bad for your insulin levels, they are also terrible for your waistline!
Fresh is best when available. Frozen vegetables packaged without sauces or butter are fine also.
Use smaller plates. It makes your servings look larger.
For more information, go here: