Health News

Ok. You Gained Weight. These 5 Tips Will Get You Back on Track

Kirby Bumpus, MPH

BY KIRBY BUMPUS, MPH

 

Whether you are starting your weight loss journey, finding yourself in the middle of the struggle or working on maintenance, here are tips to keep you on track:

1. START NOW AND START SMALL   2. LOSE THE GUILT   3. CONSIDER HELP FROM THE PROS

Read the entire article here.

 

7 Tips for Mastering the Mental Side of Getting Fit

Paul L. Underwood   BY PAUL L. UNDERWOOD      myfitnesspal.com
All of us struggle with the mental side of being active, whether we’re neophytes looking to get in shape or seasoned trainers struggling with our latest challenge. It helps to remember that being fit isn’t some magical, permanent state of being. It’s an act of constant becoming, and it requires a certain discipline to make it a habit.
1. GOALS ARE OVERRATED
2. DON’T EXERCISE — TRAIN
3. GET SOCIAL
Read the entire article HERE.

Entrepreneurship

The Women’s Business Development Council provides loans up to $10,000 to help start or grow a business. It can be used for such things as working capital, new hires, furniture, inventory, supplies, equipment and/or machinery. The Women’s Business Development Capital micro-loan fund offers flexible guidelines to help businesses build better credit and improve their attractiveness to traditional lenders.  For more information and to learn more, call 203-751-9550 or visit http://www.ctwbdc.org/.

Gun Violence

Gun violence affecting my students deserves national attention, too

Chris Fisk is a teacher at Miami Northwestern Senior High School. The opinions expressed in this commentary are his own.

(CNN)“Raise your hand if you or someone you know has been the victim of gun violence.”

As a high school teacher, this is not how I want to start my classes. After Sunday’s deadly shooting in the Miami neighborhood of Liberty City, I’ve watched as every single hand, in every one of my classes, has been raised. That’s more than 100 ninth-graders — 14- and 15-year-olds. Gun violence is a reality that my students at Miami Northwestern Senior High School know too well.  A few of the ZIP codes in this community account for close to a third of the shootings that injured or killed children between 2012 and 2015 in Miami-Dade County. Two years ago, Liberty City, along with two other neighborhoods within an area of roughly 4 square miles, recorded and reported 8,280 individual gunshots— an average of 22 bullets a day. And just last week, the same senselessness claimed a 4-year-old girl in the community.
Read the entire article here.

Don’t Forget Flint!

Lead crisis: Flint braces as Michigan shuts down free bottled water sites

“My water stinks. It still burns to take a shower. There’s no way they can say it’s safe.”

by Erik Ortiz /  / Updated 

Shawn Jones, 42, right, and Tony Price, 54, distribute bottled water at a point of distribution in Flint, Michigan on Aug. 11, 2017.Terray Sylvester /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP file

 

After Michigan’s governor announced the state will stop providing free bottled water to residents of Flint — afflicted four years ago by lead-tainted drinking water — churches and charities said Monday they’re bracing for a surge in people seeking help.

 “Normally we give out whatever a family wants,” said Bill Quarles, a deacon of the First Trinity Missionary Baptist Church. “But now we may have to limit that until more supplies come in.”

Economic Justice

 What Is Economic Justice?

Read what major theologians and Bible scholars say about economic justice

Unemployment, poverty wages, unsafe jobs, globalization, the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer, taxes (who pays and how much), inadequate public schools, lack of health care, the right to form a union (and why someone might want to), imports from China and closed factories in the U.S. – these are issues of economic justice. And they are very complicated issues.

But things are a little simpler for people of faith. We measure the economy against one fundamental truth: the earth and all that is in it belong to God (Ps. 24:1). God has blessed us with abundance and God’s vision for every one of God’s people, all 7 billion of us, is to live in the fullness of life. God intends for us to fully share God’s gifts (Exodus 16: 16-18). There is enough for all our needs if we share God’s resources. Each of us can live an abundant life.

But we know that this radical equality is not reflected in the economic realities of our world. Some of us have very little while others have very much. The question: “who has how much of what?” is a fundamental economic question.

Examining a question like this can make us uncomfortable because it delves into topics like money, wealth, poverty, privilege, and disadvantage. But the church must address these matters because economic questions are also moral questions. Do some people have too little money and resources? Do others have too much? Does everyone deserve health insurance, affordable housing, and a good public education? If so, who should pay for it? These are all economic questions that also involve moral judgments.

As people of faith, before we begin working to change the economic system we must first discern, as best we can, a vision of what God wills for our society and our economy. For many people, this would be a world where no one is poor, homeless, living in substandard housing, or lacking the nutritious food and health care needed for a healthy life. Everyone who wanted a job would have one.

Once we have a vision, we can we begin working to put it in place – by lobbying our elected representatives for the needed legislation, standing with striking workers, resisting unfair international trade and investment agreements, sharing our abundance, ensuring the social safety net is sufficient, and taking other actions to make certain that all God’s children receive a fair share of the resources that God provides for us all.

Staff members of the UCC’s Justice and Witness Ministries educate and advocate around a number of economic issues: poverty, wealth, and growing inequality; workplace justice especially for low-wage workers; ensuring all wages are living wages; supporting the right of workers to form unions; strengthening workplace rights for native-born and immigrant workers; opposing biased trade and investment treaties; working to reform harmful or ineffective practices of the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization; ending the economic crisis and building a new economy that works for everyone; and reshaping the federal budget to better meet our needs. These are big issues. But we know God walks with us as we work for justice.

Click here for more information.

Black Infant Mortality

More to Think About: Black Infant Mortality

Read the entire article here.   By Linda Villarosa

Editor’s note: This is an excerpt from “The Hidden Toll,” the cover story in the NY Times Sunday magazine.
Black infants in America are now more than twice as likely to die as white infants — 11.3 per 1,000 black babies, compared with 4.9 per 1,000 white babies, according to the most recent government data — a racial disparity that is actually wider than in 1850, 15 years before the end of slavery, when most black women were considered chattel. In one year, that racial gap adds up to more than 4,000 lost black babies. Education and income offer little protection. In fact, a black woman with an advanced degree is more likely to lose her baby than a white woman with less than an eighth-grade education.
This tragedy of black infant mortality is intimately intertwined with another tragedy: a crisis of death and near death in black mothers themselves. The United States is one of only 13 countries in the world where the rate of maternal mortality — the death of a woman related to pregnancy or childbirth up to a year after the end of pregnancy — is now worse than it was 25 years ago. Each year, an estimated 700 to 900 maternal deaths occur in the United States.
In addition, the C.D.C. reports more than 50,000 potentially preventable near-deaths, like Landrum’s, per year — a number that rose nearly 200 percent from 1993 to 2014, the last year for which statistics are available. Black women are three to four times as likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than their white counterparts, according to the C.D.C. — a disproportionate rate that is higher than that of Mexico, where nearly half the population lives in poverty — and as with infants, the high numbers for black women drive the national numbers.

The crisis of maternal death and near-death also persists for black women across class lines. This year, the tennis star Serena Williams shared in Vogue the story of the birth of her first child and in further detail in a Facebook post. The day after delivering her daughter, Alexis Olympia, via C-section in September, Williams experienced a pulmonary embolism, the sudden blockage of an artery in the lung by a blood clot.

Tennessee lawmakers punish Memphis for removing statue of Confederate and KKK leader

Image result for nathan bedford forrest

Tennessee lawmakers punish Memphis for removing statue of Confederate and KKK leader

A few years before Nathan Bedford Forrest became the leader of the Ku Klux Klan, and decades before a statue of him was dedicated in Memphis, the Confederate general overlooked Fort Pillow and planned how he would destroy the beacon for escaped slaves.

Numerous assaults eroded the garrison in April 1864. When the commander declared that he would not surrender, Forrest sent waves of rebels to finish off the dwindling Union troops — many of them black. “The sight of negro soldiers,” a Confederate witness said afterward, “stirred the bosoms of our soldiers with courageous madness.” The Mississippi River was blood red for 200 yards, Forrest later said.

In 1905, a statue of Forrest on horseback was dedicated in a Memphis park, 40 miles south of the site of the battle and later massacre.

On Tuesday, nearly 154 years to the day that his troops obliterated the fort, Forrest’s ghost — and his statue — haunted the Tennessee legislature.

The Republican-dominated House voted to remove $250,000 earmarked for the Memphis bicentennial next year after the city engineered a way to remove that statue in December, along with a statue of Confederate president Jefferson Davis. The amendment was adopted in a $37.5 million spending bill still working its way through state chambers for approval.

“This is one of the most vile, racist acts I’ve seen happen in the legislature,” state Rep. Antonio Parkinson (D), who represents Memphis, told The Washington Post on Wednesday. Parkinson is part of the majority-black population of Memphis.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) blasted the amendment.

“From Scopes Monkey Trial, to 10 Commandments resolution of ’96, & now to punishment of Memphis for removing statues that honor leaders of the Confederacy, the TN House of Representatives sadly continues to embarrass Tennessee across the nation,” Cohen wrote Wednesday on Twitter.

Parkinson was joined by House Democrats and several Republicans in opposition to what they called a punitive measure after the December statue removals. The city skirted laws meant to block removals of memorials on public grounds by selling two parks containing the statues to a new nonprofit called Memphis Greenspace for $1,000 each.

 “They act like Nathan Bedford Forrest is their God,” Parkinson said, referring to proponents of the amendment in the House. “What I see is a vicious, violent individual who made his fortunes out of the human slave trade.”  Read the entire article here.

What’s Auschwitz? 2/3 of Millennials Don’t Know it Was a Nazi Death Camp, Survey Reports

What’s Auschwitz? 2/3 of Millennials Don’t Know it Was a Nazi Death Camp, Survey Reports

Image result for auschwitzMost American millennials don’t know what Auschwitz was, a survey finds.

Despite the slaughter of nearly a million Jews — as well as hundreds of thousands of Poles, Roma, Soviet prisoners of war and others — at the World War II Nazi death camp, a survey commissioned by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany found that 66 percent of Americans ages 18 to 34 “cannot identify what Auschwitz was.” The figure for all adults was 41 percent.

The survey also found that 31 percent of all Americans and more than 4-in-10 millennials believe that 2 million Jews or fewer were killed during the Holocaust, substantially less than the historically accepted figure, which is closer to 6 million.

“I was astounded by those figures. This just goes to show the world forgets easily, and we pay a dear price for not remembering,” said Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which works to promote awareness of European genocide. Read the entire article here.