Texas Newspaper Omits Same-Sex Spouse’s Name in Obituary

Texas Newspaper Omits Same-Sex Spouse’s Name in Obituary

The newspaper publisher removed the husband’s name because he believed it was ‘contrary to God’s word.’

By Alexa Lardieri, Staff Writer March 16, 2018, at 3:26 p.m.

A SAME-SEX COUPLE IN Dallas is accusing a newspaper of discrimination after the paper omitted one of their names in a family member’s obituary. After Barry Giles’ mother, Brenda Light, died in February, the local newspaper in Olton, Texas, removed his husband’s name from her obituary, citing “religious and ethical reasons,” Fox 4 News reported.  In the original obituary sent to The Olton Enterprise, Giles wrote, “Those left to cherish her memory include her son, Barry Giles and his husband, John Gambill of Dallas.” Giles and Gambill have been together for 31 years.  However, when it was published, there was no mention of Gambill.  Read the entire article here.

Helping Poor And Migrants Is ‘Equally Sacred’ As Fighting Abortion

Pope Francis: Helping Poor And Migrants Is ‘Equally Sacred’ As Fighting Abortion

Pope Francis issued a scathing rebuke of Catholics who prioritize some church laws and doctrines ― including those condemning abortion ― over fighting for the poor and the oppressed.

In an apostolic exhortation released Monday, Francis lamented that some Catholics think of protecting many marginalized groups as a secondary or superficial issue. The pontiff said that while efforts to restrict abortion are crucial, it’s just as important for members of his flock to fight for the rights of the “already born.”

Francis wrote in his exhortation, “Equally sacred, however, are the lives of the poor, those already born, the destitute, the abandoned and the underprivileged, the vulnerable infirm and elderly exposed to covert euthanasia, the victims of human trafficking, new forms of slavery, and every form of rejection.”

Read the entire article here.

Lessons the Church Can Learn from Black Panther

 4 Lessons the Church Can Learn from Black Panther

Ryan Duncan   Feb 23, 2018

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I know what you’re thinking, “What could possibly be said about Black Panther which hasn’t already been said?” Marvel’s latest foray into the Cinematic Universe was easily one of the most anticipated movies of 2018, and since its debut, Black Panther has absolutely mauled the box office competition. The film has been praised by critics and fans of all backgrounds, inspired countless articles about the dangers of inequality, and reminded viewers how great stories can help build bridges. There’s so much to take in, and plenty which has already been discussed. For my part though, I’d like to focus on a specific audience which could benefit from the lessons found in Black Panther: the Church.

While there are many valuable takeaways to be found in this Marvel hero, here are just four all Christians should consider:

1. Representation is Important

Even before its release, Black Panther had garnered a huge following thanks to its representation of Africans, woman, and people of color. T’Challa isn’t just a superhero, he’s also a king and an ambassador for his people. His sister Shuri is brave, intelligent, and funny, while the Dora Milaje are warriors who epitomize power and dedication. Each character is proud of their heritage and of who they are. They’re the type of heroes who inspire audiences down to their bones.

 

2 Ministers Are Trying To Revive The Campaign To End Poverty That MLK Started

2 Ministers Are Trying To Revive The Campaign To End Poverty That MLK Started

“The time is now — more than ever — for us to have a Poor People’s Campaign.”

 

He couldn’t stop thinking about them, their wide eyes and the silent hunger that lay behind them.  Staring up at the ceiling from his motel bed, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. told his closest confidant, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, that the impoverished children they visited earlier that day were cemented in his mind.

It was June 1966 and the pair had stopped by an early Head Start facility in Marks, Mississippi, which is the seat of Quitman County, a devastatingly poor area in the alluvial plains of the Mississippi Delta that was thought to be the most impoverished in the country at the time.  Quitman had everything King fought against: A lack of job and home security, particularly for the black sharecropping families who often lived in shacks on the plantations where they worked unpredictable harvests. Abysmal schools, where black students were taught in poorly ventilated classrooms with out-of-date textbooks and school lunches they couldn’t afford.

But it was what King saw in that Head Start facility, a program developed to prepare young children for school, that would push him to launch the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign, an effort to demand economic security and an improvement in the quality of life for impoverished Americans. After watching a teacher cut an apple into quarters in order to feed four children, he broke down in tears — an unusual display of public emotion from King. Ultimately, he made the small town of Marks the launching pad for his campaign’s march on Washington, planned for the spring of 1968.

Read the entire article here.