Welcome to Faith

Faith Congregational Church, a vibrant, inclusive Christian community working for social justice through service to God, each other and our neighbors.

Welcome to the Faith Congregational Churc h website. You will find exciting videos, articles, and information designed to lift your spirit and feed your desire for helpful information. Faith Church is a diverse worship community, an inclusive, justice-minded and unapologetic about our faith and our witness. We celebrate diversity, we celebrate community and we celebrate Jesus Christ. It’s that simple, but be clear that there is so much more.

We invite you to explore the many ways we seek to be a faithful church in these challenging days. Ask us your questions, we like questions. Our church may be old, in fact, it is the oldest predominately black church in the city of Hartford, but our thinking is not old at all. We are affiliated with the United Church of Christ, the first mainline church in America to speak out against slavery, the first mainline church to ordain a woman and the first church to ordain a gay person into ministry in our nation. We stand on the side of justice because we want to always seek to be on the right side of history and besides that to do what we believe Jesus our elder brother and head of the church commands.

If you are in the Greater Hartford area, come worship with us. Whoever you are, you are very welcome at Faith. Now explore the website fully, come back to it often and know that we seek your prayers as we go forward in faith.

Pastor Steve

Who We Are – Where We Are Going – What We Believe!

We Celebrate Diversity

We are a church that welcomes all (and we do mean all)! No matter who you are and where you may be on life’s journey, you are welcome at Faith Congregational Church. We work toward celebrating all people, young and old, Black, Brown, and White, gay and straight, rich and poor; whomever God sends we will seek to embrace.

We Celebrate Community

We are a church faith community that embraces the wider community and seeks to serve in ways we can. Faith Church is a place where the community can come to talk, to work, to grow. We will be part of the solution,  seeking to address community concerns. We will work for justice, not just us.

We Celebrate Jesus

We will celebrate the presence of Jesus Christ in our lives. We will never apologize for our love of Jesus Christ but will celebrate the faith of others and even those with no faith. For us, Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life. We will invite others to know Jesus and will share the love of Christ whenever and wherever we can.

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Monday – Wednesday 9:00 – noon        860-547-0820

 
 

Isaiah 6:1-8 

Isaiah’s Commission

In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord, high and exalted,seated on a throne; and the train of his robe filled the temple. Above him were seraphim, each with six wings: With two wings they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they were flying. And they were calling to one another:

“Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty;
    the whole earth is full of his glory.”

At the sound of their voices the doorposts and thresholds shook and the temple was filled with smoke.

“Woe to me!” I cried. “I am ruined! For I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips, and my eyes have seen the King,the Lord Almighty.”

Then one of the seraphim flew to me with a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with tongs from the altar. With it he touched my mouth and said, “See, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away and your sin atoned for.”

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?”

And I said, “Here am I. Send me!”

New International Version (NIV)

 

Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

 

 

 

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From the Pastor’s Study

Dear Faith Family and Friends:

There are a number of articles about the Alabama trip. Here is a link to some articles from the CT-UCC and other sites:  https://www.ctucc.org/newsdetail/selma-trip-12667367 
 
Our own Rev. Mia Douglas will be in concert here at Faith on Sunday, February 24 at 4 p.m. Be sure to come back that afternoon for this great event.
 
We’re celebrating the ordination of Garrick Jordan on March 31 at 3 p.m.  Mark your calendars now!
 
But also don’t forget that Ash Wednesday and Wonderful Wednesdays in the Word, plus an exciting holy week schedule is not far from now. Ash Wednesday is March 6th and the service is always a moving and spiritually uplifting service as we begin the 2019 Lenten season. 
 
Please come out and support your church with the many anniversary services and offerings, but also by being present each Sunday morning you are able to do so.  
 
 Be blessed… Pastor Steve
 
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Want a CD of the service? Give Bruce MacCullagh a written request or send him an email.  
Need a ride to church? See Deacon Pam Walters for details and to schedule a pickup.
Know someone in need? Leave a message for Pastor Steve, or with Patricia Gray or Deacon Pam.
Need stewardship envelopes? See Alice Lumpkin, Olga Callender or Barbara Wiggins -or contribute online using the “Donate” button.
Need more information?  Call the church office  860-547-0820 Monday through Wednesday mornings. Sunday service begins at 10 am.

 

31-days calendar near round white analog alarm clock

 

 @ Faith Church

MEN OF FAITH  Men’s Ministry Monday evenings @ 5:30 p.m.   Bible Study, Food and Fellowship! All men are welcome. Call Deacon Al Strother or church office for more information.

 
 
 

Don’t forget, GIRL SCOUT TROOP 10003 meets on 2nd and 4th Sundays from 1 – 2:30 pm. We are really proud of our girls.

WNK_1209
 

There is a seat for you on Tuesday at Bible study. We start at 7 pm. Great group, great conversation, and great learning! We resume  February 5, 2019.

 
 
WOMEN’S MINISTRY  We have started our Shoebox Ministry for the youth of S.A.N.D. school, so feel free to bring your shoe boxes (or shoebox-sized plastic container) filled with items they might need (no perishables) to our next meeting. This is an ongoing project, so we appreciate your dedication! 
Remember, Women’s Ministry dues are $50 per calendar year, so please write “Women’s Ministry Dues” on your envelope and/or the note portion of your check.
 
 

The CHOIR could use your voice! It’s a great way to serve at Faith Church. Wayne Dixon is waiting. Choir rehearsal on Wednesday at 7 p.m.     

 

Sunday School

Sunday School for children is in the Winter/Spring term.  Join us. Volunteer for one Sunday per month. We look forward to seeing you and your children.

 

Nursery Staffed for Sunday Services

A reminder: the nursery is available when your child is restless or unhappy during service. You may not mind your child’s crying, but others would like to hear the service.

volunteers

Would you like to volunteer? We need Sunday School teachers for the spring,  a historian,  liturgists and just maybe you can think of ways that you too can help! See Pastor Steve or Patricia Hollis for details.

 

 

man covering his face with blue bookRemember our Sick and Shut-ins. Don’t forget to send a prayer, card or note. If you don’t see someone, why not call and see how they are doing?

Deacon Mamie Barnum  @ home  

Felicia Heard @ home                  

 

    

Special Events  @ Faith Church

 

Faith Church and Other Leaders Take Civil Rights History Trip

Over the past few years, Faith Congregational Church has sponsored, with assistance from the City of Hartford, groups of youth who want to learn about non-violence. These youth have taken trips to places which have a lasting impact on our perception of violence such as Ground Zero, Sandy Hook, and the scene of Bloody Sunday, the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. They have met monthly to discuss what violence looks like, how it affects them, and what they can do about it.  The program changed lives.

In January 2019, a group of adult Christians and Jews, black and white,  from the Greater Hartford area visited a portion of that itinerary and learned about civil rights violence first hand. The trip, which has grown from members of Faith Congregational Church and its sister congregation, Immanuel Congregational Church, is now being co-sponsored by and includes travelers from the Jewish Federation Association of Connecticut (JFACT) and the Jewish Federation of Greater Hartford’s Jewish Community Relations Council. The Alabama trip included visits to new civil rights museums  (The Legacy Museum:  From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration and the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which commemorates 4,000 lynching victims, opened to the public on April 26, 2018, in Montgomery, Alabama) as well as the Edmund Pettis Bridge in Selma (the sight of Bloody Sunday), the 16th Street Baptist Church and Kelly Ingram Park  in Birmingham. Youth who participated in the trips were changed, and the adults who participated were affected just as strongly. Trip photos and comments are posted as  January posts and will have their own page.  https://www.ctucc.org/newsdetail/selma-trip-12667367  

 

Faith Celebrates Its 200th Anniversary!

Faith Congregational Church in Hartford, Connecticut began in 1819 as a place for African Americans to worship on their own since they were previously only able to worship in the backs of churches and in church galleries (balconies). Unable to sit in the main sanctuary and tired of second class treatment, a group of African Americans began worshipping in the conference room of the First Church of Christ in Hartford, Connecticut, which is now known as Center Church. Our ancestor congregation moved to a building on State Street in 1820 and formed the first black Congregational Church in Connecticut and the third oldest in the nation. (According to Mary M. Donohue and Whitney Bayers writing for Connecticut Explored at connecticuthistory.org, Dixwell Avenue Congregational Church in New Haven was founded in 1820 as the African Ecclesiastical Society by Simeon Jocelyn, a white abolitionist, and 24 former slaves.)

The church, now known as Faith Congregational Church, initially called itself the African American Religious Society of Hartford and vowed to create a place of worship where there would be no assigned seating and where anyone was welcome to worship. The congregation purchased property in 1826 where it built a stone-and-brick church on the corner of Talcott and Market Streets.

For more information, read HERE  

Watch this space for event information during our year-long celebration.

 

 Our Conference 

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In early January, a delegation of 37 Christians and Jews from Hartford traveled together to Alabama to retrace the steps of civil rights leaders.   United Church of Christ representatives included Connecticut Conference Minister the Rev. Kent Siladi, Immanuel Congregational Church Senior Pastor the Rev. Kari Nicewander, Immanuel Associate Pastor The Rev. Isaac Lawson and Faith Congregational Church Pastor Stephen Camp.  Their reflections on the trip are posted here:  

Reflections

Seeing Is Believing– Stephen Camp

I Felt Fear. But We Shall Overcome – Isaac Lawson

To Tell the Truth: Reflections on Alabama – Kari Nicewander

You Can’t Change What You Don’t Acknowledge– Kent Siladi

News Coverage of the trip:

In Honor of Martin Luther King Day, CT Jewish Ledger, Jan. 15, 2019

Selma Tourism Impacted by Government ShutdownAlabama News Network, Jan. 4, 2019

Local Interfaith Leaders to Retrace Civil Rights History, We-Ha.com, Dec. 27, 2018

CTUCC Confirmation Retreats
March 1 – 3
April 5 – 7
Silver Lake Conference Center, Sharon CT

Join us for a great experience with activities, worship, and fellowship appropriate for youth in grades 7-9 during their Confirmation year.

Interfaith Exploration
March 31, 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Hartford Seminary, Hartford, CT

An exploration of the three Abrahamic Religions – Christianity, Islam and Judaism – designed for confirmation classes and youth groups.

 

YOUTH@SYNOD

The UCC General Synod will take place in Milwaukee, WI on June 21-25, 2019 and the Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut Conferences are collaborating to sponsor a trip to Youth @ Synod.   Youth at Synod is for young leaders ages 13 to 18 who want to experience the vibrant diversity of the wider church.  Teens from all over the country will participate in worship and plenary sessions, attend hearings and track resolutions, and join in mission work to serve the greater Milwaukee area.  Synod is an opportunity to nurture advocacy skills around justice issues.  More information

Mission Trip    The Conference is organizing a week-long trip to the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota from May 11 to May 18, 2019.  Simply Smiles, an organization founded by Bryan Nurnberger, who grew up in the Naugatuck UCC congregation, will be our hosts and guides.  We will be staying in the town of La Plant, one of the most impoverished places in America, working to restore hope for a better future. We have not finalized travel arrangements, but the total cost should be about $1,400.  Many congregations will provide support for members.  Online registration  –  https://macucc-reg.brtapp.com/SimplySmilesServiceandLearningTrip

Please contact me at charliek@ctucc.org or 860-761-7111 if you have questions.  Charlie Kuchenbrod

 

Image result for first congregational church danbury ctNEWSTIMES: Danbury, First Congregational Church negotiating sale to city

The steeple of the First Congregational Church of Danbury will remain an iconic part of the city’s skyline for years, though for more than church music.

 

@ Our Community

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https://depositphotos.com/30561155/stock-video-downtown-hartford-connecticut-skyline.html
 
 
 
 City of Hartford
VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION PROGRAM 
The City of Hartford is seeking submissions for Volunteer and Youth Volunteer of the Month for February 2019.  Volunteer work must be performed within the City of Hartford, but the individual is not required to live within the City.  Please click the nomination link below to learn more and to nominate someone who makes a difference in our community each day.  Click Here to Nominate someone for Volunteer of the Month

 

Are You Looking for a Job?

JOB CORPS is recruiting. recruiting.jobcore.gov  or (800) 733-JOBS [5627]

The City of Hartford is currently hiring.   Click HERE for more information.

 

 

SNAP SCHOLARSHIPS

 
 
 
 
 

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City Council Meeting

The next Council meeting will be held on Monday, February 11, 2019 at 7 PM, preceded at 6 PM by public comments.  All meetings are held in Council Chambers in Hartford City Hall, 550 Main Street, 2nd Floor.

Click Here for a Complete List of Meetings Dates & Agendas  

Board of Education Meetings

Regular Meetings 
February 19, 2019 – Bulkeley High School
March 19, 2019 -M D Fox


Workshop/Special Meetings 
March 5, 2019 – Naylor

 

All workshops are held on the first Tuesday of each month at 5:30pm., and regular meetings held on the third Tuesday of each month at 5:30pm. Workshops will not be held in July and August.  *Meeting dates/locations subject to change.

Click Here for a Complete List of Meetings Dates & Agendas

Encounters: #MeToo 

Saturday, March 9, 2019  10am – 12pm with lunch to follow

Hartford Courant Room  Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art
600 Main Street, Hartford

Join us as we discuss artistic responses to gender and sexual violence alongside the powerful, contemporary movement which brings light to sexual harassment and sexual assault. Participants will join in a dialogue exploring the #MeToo movement and the paintings of MATRIX artist Emily Mae Smith, on exhibit at the Wadsworth Atheneum. Additional texts under discussion will be posted in advance. The event is free, but please RSVP faculty@wadsworthatheneum.org to reserve a seat and lunch.

 

 

Health & Human Services – Change in Dial A Ride Shuttle Schedule

EFFECTIVE 01/21/2019 there will be a change in the Monday Grocery Shuttle schedule.  Please click on image to download complete schedule. 

For more information, please call 860-757-4737.

 

 

 
 

Like Jazz? Want to Keep Up With What’s Happening?

You can add the Hartford Jazz Society’s events to your calendar automatically HERE.

Hartford Public Library

About Encounters

The Hartford History Center at Hartford Public LibraryThe Amistad Center for Art & Culture, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, the Old State House, and UConn Humanities Institute -UCHI formed a community engagement partnership to present Encounters, a series focused on encouraging informed and informal conversations about issues that affect our lives. The aim is to strengthen our ability to know ourselves and to develop a forum for respectful and challenging dialogue. Look around this page for various events by subject area or click HERE for more information.

 

Free Stuff

Freebooksy.com sends a daily email with free ebooks for the day. If you read books on a Kindle, Nook, tablet, phone, or laptop, you may find this useful and cost-effective. 

Go to GreaterGood.org to help others for free.

Go HERE to find free dental care.

Improve your vocabulary and donate rice to help hungry people HERE.

Not free but cheap!!!  CheapOAir!

Go here to find free stuff like paper towels, beauty products, etc.

 

 

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Baby Grand Jazz 2019

Ray Gonzalez will kick off the 16th season of HPL’s highly popular Baby Grand Jazz Series with a special Three Kings Day performance on Sunday, January 6. Baby Grand Jazz Concerts will be held every Sunday afternoon from 3 – 4 pm through April 28 (with the exception of Easter Sunday, April 21). The opening and closing shows will be held in the Downtown Library Atrium, the rest will be held in the Center for Contemporary Culture. Baby Grand Jazz is sponsored by The Kaman Corporation. For more information, see Baby Grand Jazz.
 

CT NOW for events

 

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Live in Hartford? Get Your Free Tickets Today!

Hartford residents who are Hartford Public Library cardholders can now reserve up to 2 free tickets to plays at Hartford Stage as part of our new partnership.  Each of the seven branches of Hartford Public Library will have a two-ticket pass per eligible show. Patrons can check online to see where passes are available, but they must ask for them in person at any of the seven Library locations.  Once you have reserved the tickets at a Library branch, you must confirm the seats by calling the box office at Hartford Stage, 860-527-5151.

Tickets for Hartford Stage’s Detroit ’67 Available starting Thursday, February 7

Hartford Public Library, in partnership with Hartford Stage, will offer free passes to library cardholders. Passes will be available at the Downtown Library and all six branch libraries. For more information, go to the HPL website.
 
Dominique Morisseau’s powerful Detroit ’67 unfolds during an explosive moment in U.S. history—the race riots that tore the city of Detroit apart. The story centers on Chelle and her brother Lank, who make ends meet by turning their basement into an after-hours party. When a mysterious woman makes her way into their lives, the siblings clash over much more than family business.

 

@ History

African American Geneology Resources

 

Every Month is Faith History Month Because Hartford History IS American History

Faith is celebrating its 200th anniversary in 2019

Faith Congregational Church has a 200-year legacy that includes a noteworthy collection of historical materials.  “We have an amazing collection of historical papers and photographs here at our church. We have a number of bibles dating back our early days, including the Pennington bible,” says Rev. Stephen W Camp, senior pastor. Pennington, the first black student to attend Yale University, was an escaped slave who became known as a preacher and writer and was a leader in the abolition movement. He and his congregation provided leadership and funds in the legal campaign for the release of the Mende people taken hostage in the Amistad case.

 

Our own Pennington Bible is on loan to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture and is on exhibit in the Slavery to Freedom Gallery.

Want to go to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture?

Same-Day Online

Same-day timed entry passes are available online beginning at 6:30 a.m. ET daily until they run out. Same-day passes are not available via phone.   CHECK SAME-DAY AVAILABILITY

Advance Online

Advance timed entry passes for individuals are released monthly. Advance timed entry passes for individuals are released on the first Wednesday of each month.  The next day for passes to be released will be Wednesday March 6.   Passes go very quickly when released.

CHECK ADVANCE AVAILABILITY ON RELEASE DAY

 

Every Month is Women’s History Month Because Women’s History IS Everyone’s History

African-American women were written out of the history of the woman suffrage movement. As the centennial of the 19th Amendment approaches, it’s time for a new look at the past.

Americans are being forced to choose between a cherished lie and a disconcerting truth as they prepare to celebrate the centennial of the 19th Amendment in 2020. While middle-class white women celebrated with ticker tape parades, black women in the former Confederacy were being defrauded by voting registrars or were driven away from registration offices under threat of violence. Read the article here.

 

Mary Eliza Mahoney, 1st African American licensed nurse

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If you are a medical professional (particularly a Black medical professional), or just an overall Black history buff, you likely have heard of Mary Eliza Mahoney.  For those who have been denied tales of Mahoney’s excellence, she is heralded as the first African-American licensed nurse. Mahoney worked in nursing for almost 40 years before retiring, but during her time as a medical professional, as well as long after, she was a champion of women’s rights. A trailblazer, not just as a Black person, but also as a woman. Read more HERE.

5 Women Who Changed How We Think About Race

Amisha Padnani

By Amisha Padnani   

Devah Pager, a Harvard sociologist who died on Nov. 2, demonstrated the tenacious power of race in hiring decisions. We looked back through our obituary archives and found five other women, some recently deceased, whose thinking had an impact on our understanding of race. Read about these women here.

When You Are Lost, Thank Gladys West for Your GPS

In a Jan. 19, 2018 photo, Gladys West and her husband Ira West stand in their home in King George, Va. West was part of the team that developed the Global Positioning System in the 1950s and 1960s. (Mike Morones/The Free Lance-Star via AP)

byCathy Dyson, The (Fredericksburg, Va.) Free Lance-Star/AP via militarytimes.com

Gladys West was putting together a short bio about herself for a sorority function that recognized senior members of the group.  She noted her 42-year career at the Navy base at Dahlgren and devoted one short-and-sweet line to the fact she was part of the team that developed the Global Positioning System in the 1950s and 1960s. Read more HERE.

 

Henrietta Lacks

She never traveled farther than Baltimore from her family home in southern Virginia, but her cells have traveled around the earth and far above it, too.

She was buried in an unmarked grave, but the trillions of those cells — generated from a tiny patch taken from her body — are labeled in university labs and biotechnology companies across the world, where they continue to spawn and to play the critical role in a 67-year parade of medical advances.  READ MORE

 

Every Month is Black History Month Because Black History IS American History

 

Black Heritage Stamp Series Exhibition

On display February – March 2019
Hartford History Center, Hartford Public Library
500 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103

The stamps in the Black Heritage Stamp Series are the longest running United States commemorative stamps. This series began in 1976 honoring the achievements, contributions, and influences of African Americans who helped shaped American culture. This series exhibition has been curated by collector Alicia Labrador of Bridgeport, CT.

Ferocity, Courage, and Grace — Remembering the Great Frank Robinson

Meet the man who created Black History Month

 

Black History Built This

February is Black History Month. It has become the month the nation recognizes as a time to celebrate the strides and achievements black people have accomplished over the centuries. But — contrary to founder Carter G. Woodson’s intention — it has become the relegated timeframe to squeeze in as much information about a select few civil rights leaders while whitewashing their stories.  This year, we challenge that. HuffPost is celebrating Black History Month by highlighting our culture, narratives, and wholeness with the theme Black History Built This.  Let this February be a reminder for some and a lesson for others that there is no American history without black history. We built this. Read more here.

Blackface Redux

The narrative that we are encouraged to believe, or at least accept, about white people’s youthful flirtations with racism is: that was then, this is now, and I am not that person – if I ever was.   At the beginning of February, we saw a photo from the 1984 medical school yearbook page of Virginia governor Ralph Northam with a man wearing blackface standing next to a man in Ku Klux Klan robes. 

Shortly after that revelation,  Mark R. Herring, Virginia’s attorney general, admitted attending a college party in blackface some 40 years earlier.  These are not news, just individual revelations within the ongoing conversation about blackface in American society.  Comments have flowed across social media as well as print, television and talk radio. Nothing beats the visuals though.

Old yearbooks? Here are two NEW photos posted TODAY. Grace Coddington, current contributor, who was creative director for years. She has a lucrative collaboration with and . On her kitchen shelf she has a collection of racist Mammy figurines.   

 

Fashion, too, has had its moments recently with blackface. 

Read more HERE and opinion pieces HERE and HERE.

 

 

Black Migrations

Slaves

courtesy of: http://www.cambridgeblog.org/2016/02/black-history-month-slavery-and-forced-migration-in-the-deep-south/

The theme for Black History Month in 2019 is “Black Migrations” tracking the continuous movement of blacks from the American South to the industrialized North and beyond.

Beginning in the early 20th century, a growing number of black industrial leaders and black entrepreneurs emerged as families relocated from farms to cities, and from the South to the more industrialized Northeast and Midwest.

Read more here

The Long-Lasting Legacy of the Great Migration

When millions of African-Americans fled the South in search of a better life, they remade the nation in ways that are still being felt

 

By (1963), millions of African-Americans had already testified with their bodies to the repression they had endured in the Jim Crow South by defecting to the North and West in what came to be known as the Great Migration. They were fleeing a world where they were restricted to the most menial of jobs, underpaid if paid at all, and frequently barred from voting. Between 1880 and 1950, an African-American was lynched more than once a week for some perceived breach of the racial hierarchy.

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/long-lasting-legacy-great-migration-180960118/#IlFcMhg0kzBh4iEJ.99

 

 

The Changing Definition of African-American
 

How the great influx of people from Africa and the Caribbean since 1965 is challenging what it means to be African-American

 

… [a] knot of black men and women—most of them technicians at the station—were talking about emancipation and its meaning. Once I was drawn into their discussion, I was surprised to learn that no one in the group was descended from anyone who had been freed by the proclamation or any other Civil War measure. Two had been born in Haiti, one in Jamaica, one in Britain, two in Ghana, and one, I believe, in Somalia. Others may have been the children of immigrants. While they seemed impressed—but not surprised—that slaves had played a part in breaking their own chains, and were interested in the events that had brought Lincoln to his decision during the summer of 1862, they insisted it had nothing to do with them. Simply put, it was not their history.

And so the “not my history” disclaimer by people of African descent seemed particularly pointed—enough to compel me to look closely at how previous waves of black immigrants had addressed the connections between the history they carried from the Old World and the history they inherited in the New.

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-changing-definition-of-african-american-4905887/#HRJZhlqKb8Legrl9.99

 

@ Justice

Health Care for All is Justice for All

Dental Care – Free, Low Cost And Sliding Scale

Charter Oak Health Center

21 Grand Street     Hartford, CT – 06106  (860) 550-7500

Community Health Services, Inc – Dental Services

500 Albany Ave     Hartford, CT – 06120  (860) 249-9625
 

East Hartford Community Healthcare, Inc.

94 Connecticut Blvd    East Hartford, CT – 06108   (860) 528-1359
 

New Britain Dental Services

1 Washington St   New Britain, CT – 06051    (860) 224-3642
 

BBHD – Bristol Senior Dental Program

240 Stafford Ave   Bristol, CT – 06010   (860) 584-7682

Medical Care – Free or Sliding Scale

A.I. PRINCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL
Operated by Charter Oak Health Center, Inc
500 Brookfield St
Hartford, CT, 06106-3709
Tel: 860-951-7112
 
CHARTER OAK HEALTH CENTER
Operated by Charter Oak Health Center, Inc
401 New Britain Ave
Hartford, CT, 06106-3833
Tel: 860-241-0712

CHC OF HARTFORD
Hartford, CT, 06106-3305

PARKVILLE COMMUNITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Operated by Charter Oak Health Center, Inc
1755 Park St
Hartford, CT, 06106-2160
Tel: 860-695-4720

EMMACARE SHELTER
Hartford, CT, 06106-4617

CHARTER OAK HEALTH CENTER ANNEX AT 39 GRAND STREET
Operated by Charter Oak Health Center, Inc
39 Grand St
Hartford, CT, 06106-4607
Tel: 860-550-7500
 
SOUTH PARK INN
Operated by Charter Oak Health Center, Inc
75 Main St
Hartford, CT, 06106-1806
Tel: 860-724-0071
 
WHEELER FAMILY HEALTH AND WELLNESS CENTER – 49
Operated by Wheeler Clinic, Inc.
49 Woodland St
Hartford, CT, 06105-2337
Tel: 860-793-3500
 
YWCA OF THE HARTFORD REGION, INC
Operated by Charter Oak Health Center, Inc
135 Broad St
Hartford, CT, 06105-3718
Tel: 860-525-1163
 
OPEN HEARTH
Operated by Charter Oak Health Center, Inc
437 Sheldon St
Hartford, CT, 06106-1939
Tel: 860-525-3447

 

 

 Image result for fentanyl free clip art

 

Opioid Overdoses Kill More Americans Than Car Crashes 

According to the Emergency Email and Wireless Network, U.S life expectancy has been dropping year-on-year since 2015. However, it’s not due to the prevalence of a number of illnesses. It isn’t even because of the amount of car deaths on American roads. Rather, it’s down to the increasing number of opioid deaths across the country.  In some of the most recent reports, around 63,000 Americans died of an overdose in 2016; of that, almost two-thirds were the direct result of an opioid overdose. That adds up to roughly 42,249. Read more HERE.

 

CDC Reveals Deadliest Drug in the US 

According to the latest numbers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, Fentanyl is now the most commonly used drug that is involved in drug overdoses. The new report says that the rate of drug overdoses involving the synthetic opioid increased by about 113% each year from 2013 through 2016. For more information, click HERE.

 

 

Medicare / Medicaid

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

https://www.ct.gov/agingservices/lib/agingservices/choices/newtomedunderstandingyouroptions.pdf  

CHOICES:  Connecticut’s program for Health insurance assistance, Outreach, Information and referral, Counseling, Eligibility Screening: https://www.ct.gov/agingservices/cwp/view.asp?q=313032

Center for Medicare  Advocacy:   http://www.medicareadvocacy.org/medicare-info/connecticut-consumers-guide/ 

US News Health:  https://health.usnews.com/medicare/connecticut-medicare-plans  

Imaging Technology News:  https://www.itnonline.com/article/medicare-ct-lung-cancer-screening-coverage-victory-patients  

 

Obesity-Related Cancers on Rise in Young Adults 
 
According to the Emergency Email and Wireless Network, United States millennials ages 24 to 49 who are overweight are discovering that they are forming more cancers than in previous years, according to a recent study done by the Center for Disease Control. Obese individuals experience a wide variety of types of cancers which may be related to the amount they weigh. Some of these types of cancer include those such as: 

Colorectal
Uterine
Kidney
Gallbladder
Pancreatic
Multiple myelomas

Read more HERE.    
 
 

  Gun Violence

Revolver

 

Suicides are at the highest rate in decades, CDC report shows

Suicide is rare, but it’s increasing in America.

 By 

The suicide rate is the highest it’s been in decades, the latest warning sign of a worsening public health issue in America that needs far more attention. According to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47,000 Americans died by suicide in 2017. Put another way, the suicide rate was 14 people in every 100,000 — up 33 percent from 10.5 people per 100,000 in 1999. Read more HERE.

For current local crime statistics, click here. To see a map showing the locations of Hartford homicides, click here.

Americans own an estimated 265 million guns, more than one gun for every adult.  Data from the Gun Violence Archive reveals there is a mass shooting – defined as four or more people shot in one incident, not including the shooter – nine out of every 10 days on average. Click HERE for an interactive map.

 

 

 Criminal Justice

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Read the report “INCARCERATED/DETAINED YOUTH – AN EXAMINATION OF CONDITIONS OF CONFINEMENT” published by the CT Office of the Child Advocate HERE.  This report discusses what happens to young people who are detained or incarcerated in CT. The report was published in January 2019.

 

Encounters: States of Incarceration
Saturday, April 6, 2019
10am-12pm with lunch to follow

Hartford History Center  Hartford Public Library, 3rd Floor
500 Main Street, Hartford

“I have here unjustly suffered so much, and seen, and heard so much, that I am not as I was; my nature has become changed and hardened against my race—I feel myself let loose from all the ties of society—and that I have lost almost all the feelings of humanity.” This quote from an unnamed prisoner of Old Newgate Prison, the nation’s first state prison, speaks to the dehumanizing and life-altering impact of imprisonment. Join us as we discuss both the historical and contemporary issue of incarceration at the local and national level to get a better understanding of how prisons function in American society. To register, please RSVP to jeagosto@hplct.org.

 

 

Spenser Heaps, Deseret News

Rabbi Avremi Zippel poses for photographs outside the Scott M. Matheson Courthouse in Salt Lake City on Monday, Feb. 4, 2019.

A Utah Orthodox rabbi said his childhood nanny sexually abused him for 10 years. Here’s why he decided to tell his story for the first time

   |  February 5, 2019 at 4:08 pm MST

SALT LAKE CITY — From behind the witness stand, Utah Rabbi Avrohom (“Avremi”) Zippel gazes out into the sea of faces and prepares to speak.

It’s a dreary Tuesday morning, and normally, public speaking doesn’t intimidate the 27-year-old. Since he was a child — the precocious and prized eldest son of a prominent rabbi — he has reveled in the attention of a crowd. But today, sitting in a courtroom in downtown Salt Lake City, the confidence that usually comes so easily evades him.  He clears his throat, and in a voice barely above a whisper, begins to share a story that has haunted him for decades. 

Read more HERE.

OJJDP Bulletin Summarizes Juvenile Arrests

Juvenile Arrests 2016Today, OJJDP released “Juvenile Arrests, 2016.” This bulletin describes the current arrest trends for juveniles from 1980 to 2016, using data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Report.

 

 

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Photo by Zoraida Lopez

America’s Other Family Separation Crisis

Sending a mother to prison can have a devastating effect on her children. Why, then, do we lock so many women up?

By Sarah Stillman  writing in Newyorker.com

She writes, “America imprisons women in astonishing numbers. The population of women in state prisons has increased by more than eight hundred percent in the past four decades. The number of women in local jails is fourteen times higher than it was in the nineteen-seventies; most of these women haven’t been convicted of a crime but are too poor to post bail while awaiting trial. The majority have been charged with low-level, nonviolent offenses, such as drug possession, shoplifting, and parole violations. The result is that more than a quarter of a million children in the U.S. have a mother in jail. One in nine black children has a parent who is, or has been, incarcerated.”  Read the entire article HERE.

 

@ Words 

Jesus said, “But I tell you that men will have to give account on the day of judgment for every careless word they have spoken. For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words, you will be condemned” (Matthew 12:36–37)

Watch Beto O’Rourke on NFL protests

Watch President Obama’s Mandela Day speech

Watch Oprah’s Golden Globes speech

Watch President Obama’s farewell speech.

 

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Our God who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy matchless name
Let Your Kingdom reign in heaven. Dwell on earth in us, the same
Give us, Lord, this day for worship; Give us manna from on high
Give us bread to serve your kingdom, Lord our name we glorify.

Lord, forgive us, free us, love us, Grant us wisdom to forgive
Lead us not into temptation; grant us grace so we can live
Evil cannot stand against us, Your deliverance we need
Bind us, Lord, in one another, We, Your church, Your love receive.

Thine the kingdom, Thine the power, Thine the glory evermore
Thine all majesty and honor tGod to you we praise, adore
You are God, You reign forever, “Sovereign Holy Lord!” we sing
Our God who art in heaven Lord, eternal King of Kings.

(Written by Tony McNeil and dedicated to
Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta)