On Views of Race and Inequality, Blacks and Whites Are Worlds Apart

 

 

maine trip7

On Views of Race and Inequality, Blacks and Whites Are Worlds Apart

About four-in-ten blacks are doubtful that the U.S. will ever achieve racial equality

Many blacks are skeptical that the country will eventually make the changes necessary for racial equality

Almost eight years after Barack Obama’s election as the nation’s first black president –an event that engendered a sense of optimism among many Americans about the future of race relations1 – a series of flashpoints around the U.S. has exposed deep racial divides and reignited a national conversation about race. A new Pew Research Center survey finds profound differences between black and white adults in their views on racial discrimination, barriers to black progress and the prospects for change.

Read more here.  For the interactive article, click here.

Muhammad Ali

MuhammadAli

Photo source: http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/muhammad- ali

Muhammad Ali (1942-2016) was an American former heavyweight champion boxer and one of the greatest sporting figures of the 20th century. An Olympic gold medalist and the first fighter to capture the heavyweight title three times, Ali won 56 times in his 21-year professional career. Ali’s outspokenness on issues of race, religion and politics made him a controversial figure during his career, and the heavyweight’s quips and taunts were as quick as his fists. Born Cassius Clay Jr., Ali changed his name in 1964 after joining the Nation of Islam. Citing his religious beliefs, he refused military induction and was stripped of his heavyweight championship and banned from boxing for three years during the prime of his career. Parkinson’s syndrome severely impaired Ali’s motor skills and speech, but he remained active as a humanitarian and goodwill ambassador. Read more.

We Are Not Cured’: Obama Discusses Racism In America With Marc Maron

We Are Not Cured’: Obama Discusses Racism In America With Marc Maron

EPISODE 613   

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA

Marc welcomes the 44th President of the United States of America, Barack Obama, to the garage for conversation about college, fitting in, race relations, gun violence, changing the status quo, disappointing your fans, comedians, fatherhood and overcoming fear. And yes, this really happened. This episode is presented without commercial interruption courtesy of Squarespace. Go to  MarcMeetsObama.com to see behind-the-scenes photos and captions.

The South Isn’t The Reason Schools Are Still Segregated, New York Is

New York City might be a liberal hub, but that doesn’t mean white parents want their children going to school with black kids.

Rebecca KleinRebecca Klein  Editor, HuffPost Education

New York City didn’t experience school desegregation in the 1960s and ‘70s like other metropolitan areas. Unlike in Little Rock, Arkansas, the National Guard was never brought in to make sure black students could safely enter an all-white school. Unlike closer hubs, like Boston, resistance to school desegregation never escalated to a citywide crisis. New York never saw a large-scale integration program, and it was never ordered by courts to make its schools more racially balanced.  In historian Matthew F. Delmont’s new book, Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregationhe explains how New York City drove the rhetoric and resistance that allowed school desegregation to falter nationwide. In the late 1950s, years before any serious action was taken to desegregate most schools, New York City parents created the language that would lead opposition to racially mixed schools. This language — which emphasizes the importance of neighborhood schools and opposition to citywide busing — remains the weapon of choice for communities who fight integrated schools today.  Read more HERE.

Whites See Racism as a Zero Sum Game

 

toure

 

Touré     Author of “Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? What It Means To Be Black Now”

We should just call it what it is: Donald Trump is the leader of the White Lives Matter movement. Someone had to start it — they were gettin’ out of control. First, one of them became president and now they’re in the streets protesting every time a Black thug gets shot. They’re gettin’ a little too free.

Then Trump arrived like white supremacy’s version of Santa Claus with a bag full of gifts. He gave them swagger….

We should have seen Trump coming. We should have known that decades of Republican race baiting — from the Southern Strategy to welfare queens to self-deportation — and decades of the GOP welcoming racists in their tent would eventually lead to “Make America White Again.” We should have known that the browning of America and the growing inclusivity of America was not going to be taken lying down. Many people see all of that as code for the decline of white people. And to some, any advance by Black and brown people is a loss for whites.

A 2011 study called “Whites See Racism as a Zero-Sum Game That They Are Now Losing“ is painfully instructive.

Read more HERE.