I, Racist

I, Racist

What follows is the beginning of the text of a congregational reflection given by John Metta at Bethel Congregational United Church of Christ on June 28 to an all white audience. The sermon was begun with a reading of the Good Samaritan story, and a quote from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.  The text continues:

You see, I don’t talk about race to White people…It was probably about 15 years ago when a conversation took place between my aunt, who is White and lives in New York State, and my sister, who is Black and lives in North Carolina. The conversation can be distilled to a single sentence, said by my Black sister: “The only difference between people in the North and people in the South is that down here, at least people are honest about being racist.”  This perfectly illustrates why I don’t talk about race with White people.  Even – or rather, especially – my own family.

To read the entire text of this interesting sermon, click here.

A Christian Minister on Restrooms, Gender and Fear

photo credit: emilycheath.com

Rev. Emily C. Heath    Clergy, United Church of Christ

My wife and I have a joke. We tell it when we are out in public, at an airport or a restaurant or concert, and I need to use the bathroom. When I stand up to find a restroom I say to her, “Okay, honey, if I’m not out in five minutes, come look for me.”

We always laugh but, actually, it’s not that funny. The “joke” plays on the fact that I’m a gender non-conforming person, and bathrooms are not safe spaces for me. This has always been true, but in the current political climate, when states are passing laws regulating the use of bathrooms by trans and gender non-confirming people, we’ve been telling this joke more.

Sometimes gallows humor is all you have.  Read more here.

 

When Christians Won’t Say #BlackLivesMatter

When Christians Won’t Say #BlackLivesMatter

Kevin Wright    Kevin Wright currently serves as the Minister of Education at The Riverside Church in the City of New York

…[M]any Christians hesitate or refuse to say #BlackLivesMatter when one would think that their affinity for a marginalized Jewish man who preached a message of good news for the oppressed would usher them to support such a call for justice.

The theologian Howard Thurman identified this tension in his book, Jesus and the Disinherited. Thurman describes how the Sadducees (an upper class in Jesus’ day laden with privilege and economic security) were astute enough to see that their own position could be perpetuated if they stood firmly against all “revolutionaries and radicals.” In other words, when given the choice between retaining their privilege or standing with the oppressed, they chose the former.

Read more here.

Whites See Racism as a Zero Sum Game

 

toure

 

Touré     Author of “Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? What It Means To Be Black Now”

We should just call it what it is: Donald Trump is the leader of the White Lives Matter movement. Someone had to start it — they were gettin’ out of control. First, one of them became president and now they’re in the streets protesting every time a Black thug gets shot. They’re gettin’ a little too free.

Then Trump arrived like white supremacy’s version of Santa Claus with a bag full of gifts. He gave them swagger….

We should have seen Trump coming. We should have known that decades of Republican race baiting — from the Southern Strategy to welfare queens to self-deportation — and decades of the GOP welcoming racists in their tent would eventually lead to “Make America White Again.” We should have known that the browning of America and the growing inclusivity of America was not going to be taken lying down. Many people see all of that as code for the decline of white people. And to some, any advance by Black and brown people is a loss for whites.

A 2011 study called “Whites See Racism as a Zero-Sum Game That They Are Now Losing“ is painfully instructive.

Read more HERE.

The Oppressed Majority: A Poignant French Short Film about a World in Which Men Are Subject to Sexism

The Oppressed Majority: A Poignant French Short Film about a World in Which Men Are Subject to Sexism

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A tragicomic day in the life of a man who struggles for equality in a mirror-image society dominated by women.

“Those who travel with the current will always feel they are good swimmers,” NPR science correspondent Shankar Vedantam wrote in his extraordinary exploration of society’s hidden biases, “[and] those who swim against the current may never realize they are better swimmers than they imagine.”

Watch this amazing video below. Warning: for mature audiences only. French with English subtitles.