Study Says Carbs, Not Fats, Are Bad for You

Study Says Carbs, Not Fats, Are Bad for You

But don’t give up on fruits, vegetables and legumes — they’re still good for you
By Dennis Thompson  HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A large, 18-country study may turn current
nutritional thinking on its head. The new research suggests that it’s not the fat in your diet that’s raising your risk of premature death, it’s too many carbohydrates — especially the refined, processed kinds of carbs — that may be the real killer.

The research also found that eating fruits, vegetables and legumes can lower your risk of
dying prematurely. But three or four servings a day seemed to be plenty. Any additional
servings didn’t appear to provide more benefit.

What does all this mean to you? Well, a cheeseburger may be OK to eat, and adding
lettuce and tomato to the burger is still good for you, but an excess of white flour
burger buns may boost your risk of dying early.

Dehghan suggested that “the best diets will include a balance of carbohydrates and fats, approximately 50 to 55 percent carbohydrates and around 35 percent total fat, including both saturated and unsaturated fats.”

All foods contain three major macronutrients essential for life — fat, carbohydrate and protein. The optimum amounts a person should eat has been the focus of debate for decades, with the pendulum swinging from low-fat to low-carb diets over time.

Read the entire article HERE.