Environmental Racism is in CT Too!

Environmental Racism

Humankind has so much become one family that we cannot ensure our own security unless we ensure the security of all others.” - Bertrand Russell, from Simple Prosperity

Why Is Environmental Racism an Issue of Faith?

People of faith are called to care for all of our neighbors, regardless of their race, their income level, or their life circumstances. Jesus taught us this behavior in the parable of the Good Samaritan. He was also a student of the Hebrew Scriptures where he learned to “let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an everflowing stream.” Jesus did not discriminate or separate people into artificial groups, but rather declared that the Kingdom of God is available to all of God’s children.

Read more HERE.

Lead Exposure Exposes Environmental Racism

by Alli Van Leer

Environmental Justice affirms the need for urban and rural ecological policies to clean up and rebuild our cities and rural areas in balance with nature, honoring the cultural integrity of all our communities, and provided fair access for all to the full range of resources. – 12thPrinciple of Environmental Justice, 1991

For over sixty years scientists, business leaders and government officials have been aware of the detrimental impact of childhood exposure to lead. In the 1970’s research by Herbert Needleman, MD and his team in exposed the effect of even a low dose of lead exposure during childhood. Needleman et al.’s paper, “Deficits in psychologic and classroom performance of children with elevated dentine lead levels” also shifted the focus from the somatic based health effects of lead to the physiological and cognitive effects.

Lead has historically been used in a wide array of industrial products, most importantly gasoline, paint and water piping. The process of removing lead from gasoline began in 1965 and was officially banned from on road vehicles in 1996. Lead was banned from the use of paint in 1978, though remains on the wall of buildings and houses painted prior to 1978. While lead is rarely used today in water piping it remains in many homes and city water lines (Gilbert, 2006).

Read more here.

“Toxic Communities” and the Fight for Environmental Justice

JAN 8, 2015
Dorceta Taylor.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES & ENVIRONMENT / CREATIVE COMMONS
Dorceta Taylor’s most recent book, Toxic Communities, takes a magnifying glass to the modern environmental justice movement. In it, she provides an in-depth analysis of some of the biggest environmental issues facing low-income and minority communities across the U.S.  Listen to the interview here.

We Are Not Cured’: Obama Discusses Racism In America With Marc Maron

We Are Not Cured’: Obama Discusses Racism In America With Marc Maron

EPISODE 613   

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA

Marc welcomes the 44th President of the United States of America, Barack Obama, to the garage for conversation about college, fitting in, race relations, gun violence, changing the status quo, disappointing your fans, comedians, fatherhood and overcoming fear. And yes, this really happened. This episode is presented without commercial interruption courtesy of Squarespace. Go to  MarcMeetsObama.com to see behind-the-scenes photos and captions.

A Christian Minister on Restrooms, Gender and Fear

photo credit: emilycheath.com

Rev. Emily C. Heath    Clergy, United Church of Christ

My wife and I have a joke. We tell it when we are out in public, at an airport or a restaurant or concert, and I need to use the bathroom. When I stand up to find a restroom I say to her, “Okay, honey, if I’m not out in five minutes, come look for me.”

We always laugh but, actually, it’s not that funny. The “joke” plays on the fact that I’m a gender non-conforming person, and bathrooms are not safe spaces for me. This has always been true, but in the current political climate, when states are passing laws regulating the use of bathrooms by trans and gender non-confirming people, we’ve been telling this joke more.

Sometimes gallows humor is all you have.  Read more here.

 

When Christians Won’t Say #BlackLivesMatter

When Christians Won’t Say #BlackLivesMatter

Kevin Wright    Kevin Wright currently serves as the Minister of Education at The Riverside Church in the City of New York

…[M]any Christians hesitate or refuse to say #BlackLivesMatter when one would think that their affinity for a marginalized Jewish man who preached a message of good news for the oppressed would usher them to support such a call for justice.

The theologian Howard Thurman identified this tension in his book, Jesus and the Disinherited. Thurman describes how the Sadducees (an upper class in Jesus’ day laden with privilege and economic security) were astute enough to see that their own position could be perpetuated if they stood firmly against all “revolutionaries and radicals.” In other words, when given the choice between retaining their privilege or standing with the oppressed, they chose the former.

Read more here.

The South Isn’t The Reason Schools Are Still Segregated, New York Is

New York City might be a liberal hub, but that doesn’t mean white parents want their children going to school with black kids.

Rebecca KleinRebecca Klein  Editor, HuffPost Education

New York City didn’t experience school desegregation in the 1960s and ‘70s like other metropolitan areas. Unlike in Little Rock, Arkansas, the National Guard was never brought in to make sure black students could safely enter an all-white school. Unlike closer hubs, like Boston, resistance to school desegregation never escalated to a citywide crisis. New York never saw a large-scale integration program, and it was never ordered by courts to make its schools more racially balanced.  In historian Matthew F. Delmont’s new book, Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregationhe explains how New York City drove the rhetoric and resistance that allowed school desegregation to falter nationwide. In the late 1950s, years before any serious action was taken to desegregate most schools, New York City parents created the language that would lead opposition to racially mixed schools. This language — which emphasizes the importance of neighborhood schools and opposition to citywide busing — remains the weapon of choice for communities who fight integrated schools today.  Read more HERE.

Whites See Racism as a Zero Sum Game

 

toure

 

Touré     Author of “Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? What It Means To Be Black Now”

We should just call it what it is: Donald Trump is the leader of the White Lives Matter movement. Someone had to start it — they were gettin’ out of control. First, one of them became president and now they’re in the streets protesting every time a Black thug gets shot. They’re gettin’ a little too free.

Then Trump arrived like white supremacy’s version of Santa Claus with a bag full of gifts. He gave them swagger….

We should have seen Trump coming. We should have known that decades of Republican race baiting — from the Southern Strategy to welfare queens to self-deportation — and decades of the GOP welcoming racists in their tent would eventually lead to “Make America White Again.” We should have known that the browning of America and the growing inclusivity of America was not going to be taken lying down. Many people see all of that as code for the decline of white people. And to some, any advance by Black and brown people is a loss for whites.

A 2011 study called “Whites See Racism as a Zero-Sum Game That They Are Now Losing“ is painfully instructive.

Read more HERE.